E-journal of All India Association for Educational Research (EJAIAER)

 

    VOL.20                            Nos:  3 & 4                 September & December, 2008

 

BURNOUT AND STRESS AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN RELATION TO THEIR TEACHING EFFECTIVENESS

 

Indira Shukla

INTRODUCTION

In the educational process, the teacher occupies a very important place. A teacher is the medium through which objectives and plans can be actualized. For this, the teacher must have sound mental and physical health. There have been many studies stating that the person’s mental health has direct and significant relationship with his / her working efficiency. Teaching is a profession where every day radical changes occur in the educational system. These changes are likely to increase rather than reduce the level of stress in teachers. Secondary school teachers experience higher level of stress due to demanding situation, while dealing with adolescent students. Overcrowded classes, heavy syllabus and inadequate facilities make teachers’ work more complex. Researches in service industry like nursing, hotel and police have highlighted that working personnel experience varying degree of stress and burnout. Correlation between job satisfaction and performance has been proved in above mentioned professions. Present study was undertaken to study the burnout and stress among secondary school teachers in relation to their teaching effectiveness and also how the perceptions of teachers and their students differed on teaching effectiveness.

 

OBJECTIVES

1.To ascertain the relationship between burnout in terms of (a) frequency and (b) intensity  and teaching effectiveness as perceived by (i) teachers and (ii) students.

2.To ascertain the relationship between teachers’ experienced stress and teaching effectiveness.

3.To ascertain the relationship between teachers’ experienced stress and their perceived burnout.

4.To compare the relationship between perceived burnout in terms of (a) frequency and (b) intensity and teaching effectiveness as perceived by (i) teachers and (ii) students on the basis of teachers’ (a) qualification, (b) experience, (c) subjects taught, (d) type of school and (e) age.

5.To compare the relationship between teachers’ experienced stress and teaching effectiveness as perceived by (i) teachers and (ii) students on the basis of teachers’   (a) qualification, (b) experience, (c) subjects taught, (d) type of school and (e) age.

 

HYPOTHESES

1.There is no significant relationship between perceived burnout of teachers in terms of (a) frequency and (b) intensity and teaching effectiveness as perceived by (i) teachers and (ii) students.

2.There is no significant relationship between teachers experienced stress and teaching effectiveness as perceived by (i) teachers and (ii) students.

3.There is no significant relationship between teachers’ experienced stress and their perceived burnout in terms of (a) frequency and (b) intensity.

4.There is no significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout in terms of (a) frequency and (b) intensity and teaching effectiveness as perceived by   (i) teachers and (ii) students on the basis of teachers (a) qualification, (b) experience, (c) subjects taught, (d) type of school and (e) age.

5.There is no significant difference in the relationship between teachers’ experienced stress and teaching effectiveness as perceived by (i) teachers and (ii) students on the basis of teachers (a) qualification, (b) experience, (c) subjects taught, (d) type of school and (e) age.

 

Scope, limitation and delimitation

For the present study, teachers teaching std. IX have been selected. Only English medium secondary school teachers are included in the study. Teaching effectiveness had been studied by teachers’ self perception of teaching effectiveness and students’ perception of teaching effectiveness. Other sources like administrators’ perception and peer groups’ perception had not been included.

 

Variables of the Study

Independent variables were stress and burnout and dependent variable was teaching effectiveness.

 

 

METHODOLOGY

Descriptive, causal- comparative survey technique was used.

 

Sample

Sample was drawn from eleven secondary schools of Greater Bombay, using stratified sampling technique. From these eleven schools, a total of 93 secondary school teachers responded to Stress, Burnout and Teaching effectiveness questionnaires.

 

Tools

1.The Maslach Burnout Inventory (M.B.I.); 2.Teaching Stress Survey (TSS) of M. Mishra; 3. Teaching Effectiveness – Teachers’ Self Evaluation Rating Scale of  M.N. D’Silva; and

4. Students’ Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness Rating Scale of  M.N. D’Silva.

 

Inferential analysis:

Parametric statistical techniques used were: Pearson’s Product Moment Co-efficient of Correlation; One way ANOVA; t-test; and Fisher’s “Z” 

 

FINDINGS

Hypothesis 1

Significant correlation between teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers and teachers perceived burnout due to frequency and intensity of emotional exhaustion as well as personal accomplishment was established. It was also established that (a) higher level of emotional exhaustion results in lower level of teaching effectiveness and (b) higher level of personal accomplishment results in higher level of teaching effectiveness. Significant correlation between teaching effectiveness as perceived by students and teachers perceived burnout due to frequency of personal accomplishment was established. It was established that higher level of personal accomplishment results in higher level of teaching effectiveness.

Hypothesis 2

There is no significant correlation between experienced stress of teachers and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers. This means that teachers have a perception that teaching effectiveness is not influenced by the level of stress. There is no significant correlation between experienced stress of teachers and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students. This means that students have a perception that teaching effectiveness is not influenced by the level of stress of a teacher.

 

Hypothesis 3

Significant correlation between teachers’ experienced stress and teachers perceived burnout due to intensity of emotional exhaustion was established. Correlation is positive for burnout due to intensity of emotional exhaustion, indicating that higher level of intensity of emotional exhaustion results in higher level of stress. There is no significant correlation between teachers’ experienced stress and teachers perceived burnout due to (i) frequency & intensity of burnout due to depersonalization, (ii) frequency of emotional exhaustion, (iii) frequency & intensity of burnout due to personal accomplishment.

 

Hypothesis 4

The difference in relationship between burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers for inexperienced and experienced teachers is not significant. The relationship between perceived burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers on the basis of teachers’ age differ significantly for burnout due to frequency of emotional exhaustion between (i) young and middle aged teacher, (ii) middle aged and  elder teachers. The relationship between teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers and burnout due to frequency of emotional exhaustion is significant for (i) single sex and (ii) co-ed schools. There is no significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers on the basis of qualification   (qualified  and overqualified teachers).There is no significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers on the basis of school type  (aided  and unaided schools).There is no significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers on the basis of subjects taught (subject group of Language, Social science, Science).The difference in relationship between burnout due to intensity of emotional exhaustion and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students for inexperienced and experience teachers is significant. The relationship between perceived burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students on the basis of teachers’ age do not differ significantly. The relationship between teaching effectiveness as perceived by students and burnout for teachers in (i) single sex and (ii) co-ed schools do not differ significantly. There is significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout due to intensity of depersonalization and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students on the basis of qualification (qualified and overqualified teachers).There is no significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students on the basis of school type (aided  and unaided schools).There is significant difference in the relationship between perceived burnout due to intensity of emotional exhaustion and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students on the basis of subjects taught for Language subjects and Science subjects.

 

Hypothesis 5

There is no significant difference in the relationship between teachers’ perceived stress and teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers on the basis of teachers’(a) Qualification, (b) Experience, (c) Subjects taught, (d) Type of school and (e) Age. There is no significant difference in the relationship between teachers’ perceived stress and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students on the basis of teachers’ (a) Qualification, (b) Experience, (c) Subjects taught, (d) Type of school and (e) Age.

 

CONCLUSION

Teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers and burnout due to intensity & frequency of emotional exhaustion as well as personal accomplishment are significantly related. Teaching effectiveness as perceived by students and burnout due to frequency of personal accomplishment are significantly correlated. Teachers have the perception that teaching effectiveness is not influenced by the level of stress. Students also have the perception that teaching effectiveness is not influenced by the level of stress that teachers perceive. Teachers have shown positive relationship between stress and burnout due to intensity of emotional exhaustion. Relationship of teaching effectiveness as perceived by teachers and burnout did not make any difference between  (i) experienced / inexperienced teachers, (ii) qualified / overqualified teachers, (iii) aided / unaided school and (iv) subjects taught (Language / Social science / Science) with the exception of (i) Age of teachers, (ii) single sex / co-ed school. Relationship of teaching effectiveness as perceived by students and burnout did not make any difference between  (i) experienced / inexperienced teachers, (ii) Age of teachers, (iii) single sex / co-ed school, (iv) aided / unaided school with the exception of  (i) qualified / overqualified teachers and (ii) subjects taught (Language / Social science / Science). Teachers have shown that their Stress and teaching effectiveness on the basis of (i) qualification, (ii) experience, (iii) subjects taught, (iii) type of school and (iv) age of teachers are not related. Similarly teachers stress and teaching effectiveness as perceived by students on the basis of (i) qualification, (ii) experience, (iii) subjects taught, (iii) type of school and (iv) age of teachers are not related.